Buggy in nature, Microsoft Windows has always been constantly changing and evolving its User experience ever since its first release in 1985. But why is Windows not seeing any major updates in recent times? Is Microsoft slowly ditching its flagship OS off?

Windows has been the most popular OS among desktop enthusiasts with over 85% market share ever since. One of the main reasons for its dominance was OEMs shipping Windows with their cheap hardware and sole availability of major industry grade products. Be it Adobe suite or Autodesk CAD or Microsoft’s own Office suite, everything is available for Windows. Mac OS X, being the main competitor for Windows, though has most of these software, ships only with Apple’s proprietary hardware. Linux only dominates in the Servers and Supercomputer market and never had known presence in desktop market. …


With the non-commercial introduction of Netscape Navigator in 1995 and the beginning of the Internet Explorer era at the same time, the Web as we know started taking shape. A Dotcom bubble followed where thousands of Tech startups gained the advantage of the rise of the Internet and Internet-based applications but few failed, those which survived are today’s Internet Giants. The first Browser war was between these two competitors, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Mosaic derived Netscape Navigator. Navigator had its peak usage share until 1997 which slowly started declining thereafter.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Browser_Wars_(en).svg
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Browser_Wars_(en).svg

By 2001, Microsoft’s strategies made Internet Explorer a huge success with more than 75% market share worldwide. The year 2004 saw the surviving transition of Netscape Navigator into the open source Mozilla Firefox, as we know it today. Though Opera was available since 1996, it started gaining some noticeable market fraction only after 2004. While Internet Explorer was the default Web browser on Apple’s classic Mac and OS X, Safari superseded it with the introduction of OS X Panther in 2003. …


While the In-Browser email clients for most of the mail providers are feature rich, native clients have their own added benefits.

On Android or iOS, the selection has varieties. Google’s very own Gmail app, Bluemail, K-9 mail, Nine, Microsoft’s Outlook, ProtonMail, Zoho Mail, Yahoo Mail and the list continues to grow. On Windows, we have Official Microsoft Outlook app among eM Client, Thunderbird, Hiri, Inky, Mailspring, Spike which handles emails pretty well. Few of these are open source and free while others provide enterprise features on paid basis. …


Yes, you read it right. “Chrome is a Malware.”

Ever since I have been using Motorola One Power (purchased July 19), I never used Google Chrome. Moreover, I had disabled all the Google apps except YouTube and Play Services. But recently, with the Covid-19 bringing everything on the digital platforms, this couldn’t last anymore.

My University requires me to use Google Meet. All the class updates are forwarded through Google Classroom. Moreover, all the WhatsApp groups have slowly started to migrate to Google Groups. Attendance is taken through Google Sheets and Docs. …

About

Vivek Vaishya

Computer Engineer (B.E.), Qt Qml Developer

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store